Year 7
Art is taught 5 times over a two week cycle and is a part of the Technology rotations with Food Technology, Product Design & Resistant Materials. The Technology Department has one full time Art teacher, Mrs C Rose.

Subject Content

Unit One

The focus is on drawing and mark making, exploring the work of Jim Dine and the theme of objects and products. Pupils will learn how to analyse images, draw to scale and record images accurately. They will progress onto a range of creative outcomes learning about the different ways of recording information in a range of media.

  • Introduction to Health and Safety in art & design
  • Using and developing skills in analysing other peoples art to inform and inspire own images
  • Using and developing skills in using ICT to research and present information on artists work
  • Introduction to the idea of mark making in art
  • Basic drawing skills developed through the use of drawing and mark making materials
  • Exploring the idea of experimenting and drawing onto different surfaces to create a variety of outcomes

Unit Two

The focus is on colour theory and exploring primary, secondary and tertiary colours, warm and cool colours, contrasting colours and harmonious colours. Pupils will develop knowledge and skills in using oil pastel techniques, painting and coloured pencil. They will learn about blending and mixing colours. They will explore a variety of themes and artists including Andy Warhol, Piet Mondrian, Joan Miro, and Georgia O’ Keeffe to create images that will encourage them to think about colour theory in different contexts.

  • Establish connections between the work of influential artists and pupils own work to inform their own practice when exploring colour theory
  • To use observational drawing as a means of recording information
  • To develop an understanding of colour.
  • To experiment with a variety of colour schemes and make observations about different combinations.
  • To experiment with different materials and learn how to blend and mix colours
  • Continue to develop skills in analysing other peoples art to inform and inspire own images

Unit Three

The focus is on shape and pattern where pupils learn about the artist Damien Hirst and practice collage techniques to create new artwork from different images. They learn about symmetry and pattern as well as composition, background, foreground and layering.

  • Exploring collage techniques to create artwork based on butterflies
  • Develop knowledge of Damien Hirst
  • Using collage, combining image and text to communicate messages and meanings through artwork
  • Observational drawings of butterflies
  • Developing skills in print making using mono printing and poly-printing techniques
  • Continuing to develop skills in analysing other peoples art to inform and inspire own images

Assessment

Informal ongoing throughout each unit. Formal at the end of each unit

Homework

Homework is set according to the school homework timetable.

How can I support my child in their learning?

Please ensure all homework is completed to the best of their ability.

Support students with research, e.g. finding images online.  Use the internet to extend pupils understanding of the artists given for homework.

Year 8
Art is taught 5 times over a two week cycle and is a part of the Technology rotations with Food Technology, Product Design & Resistant Materials. The Technology Department has one full time Art teacher, Miss C Rose.

Subject Content

Unit One

  • Sweet art – developing skills in 3D, constructing a large scale sweet based product
  • To establish connections between pop artists’ work and pupils’ own work taking inspiration from the techniques and processes commonly used and applying these to create artwork that focuses on contemporary pop culture
  • Developing skills in 3D construction techniques
  • Establish connections between artists like Claes Oldenburg, Andy Warhol and Pater Blake
  • Continuing to develop skills in analysing other peoples art to inform and inspire own artwork
  • Building upon drawing skills and painting to apply an image to a large scale 3D piece
  • Developing observational drawing skills and drawing techniques to create highly accurate and creative images
  • Experimenting with colour mixing and colour theory and applying this to pop art final pieces

Unit Two

  • Using and developing skills in analysing other peoples art to inform and inspire own images
  • Understanding creative and imaginative drawing
  • Developing awareness of different drawing styles in art and in particular illustration
  • Find ways of expressing yourself through street art
  • Combining image and text
  • Exploring Graffiti fonts
  • Learning about composition – how to arrange and colour an image to fit in with the street art style
  • Developing skills in painting, stencilling, using oil pastels, coloured pencils and fine liners
  • Developing skills in 3d work, making a large scale street art inspired final piece

Unit Three

  • Using the work of different portrait artists to inspire a portrait of your own
  • Drawing a portrait in proportion
  • Applying different drawing styles (simplified drawing, capturing personality, capturing key features when drawing people)
  • Applying and controlling paint
  • Developing knowledge of colour theory and colours that work well together
  • Using and developing skills in analysing other peoples art to inform and inspire own images
  • Learning about how to draw the human figure in a variety of different way and experimenting with media to create different effects

Assessment

Informal ongoing throughout each unit. Formal at the end of each unit

Homework

Homework is set according to the school homework timetable.

How can I support my child in their learning?

Please ensure all homework is completed to the best of their ability.

Support your child with research, e.g. finding images online.

Year 9 - Options - BTEC
Art is taught 12 times over a two week cycle. The Technology Department has one full time Art teacher, Miss C Rose.

Subject Content

BTECs are vocationally related qualifications, where learners develop knowledge and understanding by applying their learning and skills in a work-related context. Additionally, they are popular and effective because they engage learners to take responsibility for their own learning and to develop skills that are essential for the modern-day workplace. These skills include team working, working from a prescribed brief, working to deadlines, presenting information effectively, and accurately completing administrative tasks and processes. BTEC Firsts motivate learners, and open doors to progression into further study and responsibility within the workplace. The skills learnt in studying a BTEC First will aid progression to further study and prepare learners to enter the workplace in due course. In the art and design sector, learners would be aiming to move into entry-level roles, such as assistants in design and craft production, the fashion and textiles sector, product design services, or the visual arts and visual communications sectors.

 Unit 1 – Introduction to specialist pathways in art and design

Learning aims

A – use specialist materials, techniques, equipment and processes in response to client briefs

B – record formal elements within specialist pathways.

People who work in art and design have many specialist skills. The path they follow to gain these skills includes learning in very different areas of art and design. By following this unit, you will have opportunities to find out about, and start developing, some of these specialist skills. By trying out these skills for yourself, you will find out more about where your strengths and interests lie. You will be given an introduction to some specialist pathways. You will discover how the design or making cycle works in art and design practice and learn about the specialist materials, techniques and processes of these particular specialist pathways. You will learn how professionals research widely from different sources to gain inspiration and how this helps them to generate ideas. Whichever vocational pathway you work in, you will continuously review your work to ensure that it meets your creative intentions. When you accept client briefs, you must be able to analyse what is required and identify the factors that have to be taken into account when you develop your response. You will explore, experiment with and learn how to use specialist materials and techniques relevant to your brief. You will develop your chosen specialist skills. You will also learn about, and record, the health and safety issues associated with the traditional and contemporary media, techniques and processes that you use.

Unit 2 – Creative project in art and design

Learning aims

A – develop creative ideas, skills and intentions in response to a project brief

B – produce final outcomes that meet the requirements of the brief.

Have you ever wondered what makes an artist or designer work in a certain way? How do they decide which materials and techniques to use, for example for painting, sculpture, installation, animation, fashion? This project allows you to develop your understanding of how you work and to gain skills in an area of art and design. Artists, designers and makers all explore different approaches to developing their creative work. They have different ways of making their ideas come to life through applying their chosen techniques and materials. In this unit you can develop your own creative response to a vocationally themed brief. This can be an area that you are interested in studying at a higher level in the future, or an area in which you hope to eventually find work. Or you might select it because you are interested generally in the creative industries and would like to explore and develop this interest further. This creative vocational project should inspire you through this investigation of your preferred area of art design or creative media. You can explore and apply new areas of study and new working methods. You will learn to focus your project through planning and organising, taking your ideas from concept to final outcome. You will apply what you have learnt in previous units.

Unit 3 – Communicating Ideas in 2D

Learning aims

A – explore 2D visual language and working practices

B – investigate how artists, craftspeople and designers communicate in 2D

C – communicate ideas using 2D knowledge and skills in response to a brief.

Artists, designers and craftspeople need 2D skills and knowledge to communicate their ideas effectively. Working in two dimensions requires skills in handling 2D materials and techniques. The quality of your work will depend on your use of tools and processes and in your ability to manipulate and combine 2D formal elements such as line, tone, colour, shape, pattern and surface texture to communicate ideas and feelings. In this unit you will experiment with a range of 2D mark-making activities that include drawing, painting and other disciplines, such as photography, printmaking and mixed media. You will be creating work by traditional and contemporary methods. You will gain recording skills, learn how to work from primary and secondary sources and, by exploring 2D visual language, learn to generate and develop visual communication ideas successfully. Knowledge and skills in 2D are needed for many of the units in your qualification and they are essential in helping you to prepare for vocational progression. Research into disciplines such as fashion design, graphic design and fine art, will help you to develop your skills and understanding of 2D contemporary professional practice. You will explore and investigate the methods and approaches used by artists and designers to find out how they work with 2D ideas to meet the requirements and constraints of a brief. You will find out about the ways that artists and designers inform and inspire their own ideas to enable them to communicate successfully using 2D visual language. In this unit you will explore 2D media in a series of activities that will support you in developing your visual communication skills. You will gather a range of different examples of 2D work for your portfolio. Your portfolio will demonstrate your knowledge and understanding of 2D working methods. You will learn about essential health and safety practice within the creative industries, for example using equipment safely, working safely and recycling materials.

Unit 4 – Communicating Ideas in 3D

A – explore 3D visual language and working practices

B – investigate how artists, craftspeople and designers communicate in 3D

C – communicate ideas using 3D knowledge and skills in response to a brief.

Sculptors, interior designers, architects and product designers have working in three dimensions in common. It follows that 3D art, craft and design covers a wide range of practice across different disciplines to create objects that we may see or use in our homes, in public spaces, in galleries, in shops, or in the workplace. Designers and artists who work in 3D use many different materials, techniques and processes to suit their intention. This might be for the development of a personal portfolio or in response to a brief from a client or customer. All practitioners go through a design cycle in the process of initiating, developing and reviewing their ideas. You will gain recording skills, learn how to work from primary and secondary sources and, by exploring 3D visual language, will be able to generate and develop visual communication ideas successfully. Through exploring the work of 3D artists, craftspeople and designers, you will find inspiring examples to stimulate and develop your own creative work. This unit gives you exciting opportunities for 3D designing and making. You will experiment with resistant and non-resistant materials and develop techniques in modelling, constructing, carving, joining and moulding. You will gain skills in the visual language of 3D, exploring the formal elements of volume, surface, form and structure. Through vocational briefs you will be able to apply your learning in a personal and creative way. You will explore 3D media in a series of activities designed to develop your visual communication skills. You will gather a range of different examples of 3D work for your portfolio that demonstrates your knowledge and understanding of 3D working methods. You will also learn about essential health and safety practice within the creative industries, for example using equipment safely, working safely and recycling materials.

Assessment

Each unit will make up a portfolio of work which will be assessed throughout the course.

Edexcel attach grading criteria to each unit along with detail of what factors need to be covered in order for the unit to be passed. The grading criteria, as with all BTEC qualifications are on a PASS, MERIT & DISTINCTION basis, with the pupils needing to pass all units at either level to achieve that grade overall.

The pupils will be assessed on each task, and opportunity will be given to those who wish to improve their level further.

In January there is an externally set task, which is a controlled assessment, and marked by the exam board.

Homework

Homework is set according to the school homework timetable. 

How can I support my child in their learning?

Please check all coursework is completed to a high standard.

Help with collecting research, e.g. looking at artists work on the internet, using books, magazines, etc.

Year 10
Art is taught 5 times over a two week cycle. The Technology Department has one full time Art teacher, Miss C Rose.

Subject Content

The two year course is structured around the four main assessment objectives

  • Assessment objective 1: Develop their ideas through investigations informed by contextual and other sources demonstrating analytical and cultural understanding.
  • Assessment objective 2: Refine their ideas through experimenting and selecting appropriate resources, media, materials, techniques and processes.
  • Assessment objective 3: Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to their intentions in visual and/or other forms.
  • Assessment objective 4: Present a personal, informed and meaningful response demonstrating analytical and critical understanding, realising intentions and where appropriate, making connections between visual, written, oral or other elements.

Pupils are given the opportunity to create a large variety of artwork that allows them to meet the above objectives. They will explore different media, techniques and processes and be encouraged to build up a range of technical and research skills so they can begin to work independently creating unique and original outcomes in response to a given theme. Over the two year course pupils will explore a range of themes when meeting the assessment objectives and are expected to produce creative personal outcomes that stretch their imagination and develop their skills. A main focus of the course is based around critical studies where candidates gather and document experiences relating to a school organised museum or gallery visit, or work with an artist in residence, focussing on a specific theme or technique such as; screen printing, working with lens-based and light-based media or ceramic processes.

Assessment

Each unit will make up a portfolio of work which will be assessed throughout the course against the GCSE assessment objectives.  The portfolio of work makes up 60% of the overall marks and the final exam at the end of Year 11 makes up 40%.

Homework

Homework is set according to the school homework timetable.

How can I support my child in their learning?

Please check all coursework is completed to a high standard.  Help your child with collecting research, e.g. looking at artists work on the internet, using books, magazines, etc.

Year 11 - Options - GCSE
Art is taught 5 times over a two week cycle. The Technology Department has one full time Art teacher, Miss C Rose.

Subject Content

The two year course is structured around the four main assessment objectives

  • Assessment objective 1: Develop their ideas through investigations informed by contextual and other sources demonstrating analytical and cultural understanding.
  • Assessment objective 2: Refine their ideas through experimenting and selecting appropriate resources, media, materials, techniques and processes.
  • Assessment objective 3: Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to their intentions in visual and/or other forms.
  • Assessment objective 4: Present a personal, informed and meaningful response demonstrating analytical and critical understanding, realising intentions and where appropriate, making connections between visual, written, oral or other elements.

Pupils are given the opportunity to create a large variety of artwork that allows them to meet the above objectives. They will explore different media, techniques and processes and be encouraged to build up a range of technical and research skills so they can begin to work independently creating unique and original outcomes in response to a given theme. Over the two year course pupils will explore a range of themes when meeting the assessment objectives and are expected to produce creative personal outcomes that stretch their imagination and develop their skills. A main focus of the course is based around critical studies where candidates gather and document experiences relating to a school organised museum or gallery visit, or work with an artist in residence, focussing on a specific theme or technique such as; screen printing, working with lens-based and light-based media or ceramic processes.

Assessment
Each unit will make up a portfolio of work which will be assessed throughout the course against the GCSE assessment objectives.  The portfolio of work makes up 60% of the overall marks and the final exam at the end of Year 11 makes up 40%.

Homework
Homework is set according to the school homework timetable.

How can I support my child in their learning?

Please check all coursework is completed to a high standard.  Help your child with collecting research, e.g. looking at artists work on the internet, using books, magazines, etc.